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Weather Library > Weather Myths

By DAN ROBINSON
Storm Chaser/Photographer
20 Years on the Web
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Tornado Myths

MYTH:
A funnel cloud needs to touch the ground to be a tornado, OR the visible funnel is the tornado.

Lightning Myths

MYTH:
Wearing an Ipod and headphones will attract lightning.
MYTH:
A Surge Protector will protect against all lightning strikes.
MYTH:
Small metal objects attract lightning, and I'm safer outside without any metal nearby.
MYTH:
Lightning never strikes in the same place twice.
MYTH:
The "world record lightning strike" means that lightning can strike 200 miles away from a thunderstorm.
MYTH:
During a recent videotaped lightning storm, a strike showed up only inches/feet from my camera.
MYTH:
"Catatumbo lightning" is a unique type of lightning created by swamps.
MYTH:
Lightning only strikes very tall objects / Lightning always strikes the tallest object.
MYTH:
Lightning only strikes good conductors (such as metal).
MYTH:
Wearing jewelry, wearing shoes with metal cleats or carrying metal objects such as tripods, golf clubs and umbrellas will attract lightning and make me more susceptible to a strike.
MYTH:
Lightning rods 'discharge' a cloud and prevent a lightning strike / It is possible to 'drain' the charge from a storm.
MYTH:
Lightning rods attract lightning.
MYTH:
Lightning doesn't strike water.
MYTH:
Lightning could be used as a power source.
MYTH:
Rubber shoes or boots insulate and therefore protect against a lightning strike.
MYTH:
'Heat Lightning' is a strange phenomenon caused by hot weather.

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